Tag Archives: news

Measuring in clean rooms – Hands on with the Rotronic CRP5

For many years Rotronic products have been widely used in the monitoring and control of clean rooms, however more often than not our products are found out of sight quietly performing their measurement tasks away from areas with strict requirements for cleanliness demanded by modern clean rooms.

In the past few months Rotronic have launched two new clean room panels that are as the name suggests designed specifically for use within clean room environments.

Our flagship product in the field is the CRP5 which we will take a look at first.

crp-5_pfad
CRP5 – Clean room From Rotronic

The CRP5 is a comprehensive clean room panel designed specifically for the requirements of modern clean rooms. Once installed the unit provides virtually no areas for dust to collect and the industrial glass front is extremely resistant to chemicals. With a fully configurable colour screen it is a stylish looking device!

CRP1a
Unpacking the CRP5, the glass front, colour display and stainless steel fittings make the CRP5 elegant, easy to clean and functional

Internally the CRP5 delivers some serious capability, providing potentially a solution for all your clean room measurement and monitoring requirements. Including;

  • Differential Pressure via internal diaphragm sensor (measurement via rear ports and front ports for flexible instalation and calibration).
  • Interchangeable humidity and temperature sensor.
  • Two fully configurable analogue inputs (for particle counters, lux meters etc)
  • Two configurable switch inputs (for pressure or door switches etc)
  • 6 configurable relays (for alarm triggers)
  • Digital connectivity via RS485 and Ethernet (Modbus or direct connection to Rotronic HW4 software)

A unique feature of the CRP5 is the optional flush mount humidity probe. The probe is locked into place through the use of magnets and can easily be removed for cleaning or calibration. An optional rear mount connection is available for Rotronic HC2 humidity and temperature probes should you wish to monitor ducts or spaces remote to the CRP5 itself.

CRP2
The unique removable Humidity and Temperature probe for ease of cleaning and calibration

The configurable colour display shows alarm conditions which can be acknowledged via the front panel. Alarms can be used to trigger relays associated with audible and larger visitual alarms. Interaction with the CRP5 is via four optical buttons –  their use is completely unaffected if operators are wearing protective gloves or not (unlike capacitive interfaces).

CRP3
Optical buttons can be used easily even when wearing gloves!

As an FDA and Gamp5 compliant device the CRP5 is a safe choice for regulated industries. The instrument can be used with 3rd party systems via its analogue outputs or industry standard Modbus TCP / RTU communication. Alternatively the CRP5 can be connected to the Rotronic HW4 software package to provide a one stop solution for monitoring, control and alarming. Pharmaceutical validation services as well as ISO 17025 (UKAS) calibrations are available from Rotronic if required.

To get some more detailed information about our clean room solutions give us a call or visit our website… Rotronic Website and CRP5 Datasheet

Next time we will look at the Rotronic CRP1 a dedicated temperature and humidity clean room panel for  applications with slightly simpler requirements but still demanding a clean installation  and high accuracy measurements!

crp1_side
The CRP1 – Humidity and Temperature measurements in clean rooms.

Dr Jeremy Wingate
Rotronic UK

Rotronic training course schedule 2016

We are pleased to announce our latest training course schedule for 2016. Courses include in partnership with Dave Ayres from Benrhos Ltd our practical 3 day temperature, humidity and dew point calibration and measurement uncertainty courses. In addition, for those seeking greater depth we are running dedicated courses on measurement uncertainty and ISO 17025 run by Lawrie Cronin and Dave Ayres

Temperature Humidity and Dew Point – Measurement, Calibration and Uncertainty

8th – 10th March :: 12th – 14th July :: 15th – 17th November
– Three day course at Rotronic UK offices and UKAS laboratory
– Practical applied knowledge and best practice
– Max 8 attendees to ensuring tailored content

Measurement Uncertainty for Laboratories and Plant

6th – 7th September
– Two day course at Rotronic UK offices
– Detailed knowledge for laboratory owners or process managers

Setting up and working with ISO17025

8th September
– One day course at Rotronic UK offices
– Ideal for ISO17025 lab managers or those looking to apply

For further information please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

Pharmacy Business Case – MEDICINES NEED WATCHING – CLOSELY!

Business Case BannerColleagues from our Swiss based HQ just outside Zurich have shared with us a great example of an increasingly important application based around the monitoring of medicines in typical high street pharmacies. Pharmacies may look like they simply store medicines on normal shelves but most drugs require strictly controlled and monitored conditions to ensure they reach us in perfect condition! Read on to discover more…

Medicines are sensitive products. Moisture or excessively high or low storage temperatures, can impair their quality. Incorrectly stored medicines lose their efficacy, leading to significant health risks. Correct storage is therefore vital, offering as it does the guarantee that medicines remain safe and efficacious and retain their high quality right up to their expiry date.

Meeting GDP/GMP requirements in pharmacies

The storage of medicines is legally regulated by GDP (Good Distribution Practice) Standard 9.2 and is inspected by the responsible authorities on site.

Insulins and other liquid antibiotics for instance must be stored in medicine refrigerators at a temperature between 2 °C and 8 °C. A temperature range of 15 °C to 25 °C applies to the vast majority of other medicines.It is compulsory to document the storage conditions of all medicines.

To help fulfil the legal requirements, Rotronic has launched the new HL-1D data logger – a convenient, precise, reliable logger that is virtually tailor-made for a medicinal environment.

Rosengarten Rotpunkt pharmacy

The HL-1D data logger has undergone exhaustive testing
under real-life conditions in the Rotpunkt Rosengarten
pharmacy. With its simple handling and remarkable price-performance ratio, the logger offers great potential for any pharmacy.

The Rosengarten Rotpunkt pharmacy is deeply rooted in the community of Bassersdorf, Switzerland and has been at its present location since 1985.

In 2011, Mr. Ivan Mihajlovic took over the directorship and today runs the pharmacy with a total of 10 employees.

Mr Ivan Mihajlovic
Mr Ivan Mihajlovic

“The quick evaluation of the data and the understandable visualization of the measurement values in a PDF report meet all QMS requirements and document the data long-term.”

HL-1D ideal for Pharmacies

Complete measurement chain

Rotronic offers complete solutions for the entire measurement chain. Even if you are already using other data loggers successfully, we have a range of innovative calibration solutions.

HL-1D for pharmacy

If you require more information or wish to discuss any monitoring, control or calibration applications you may have please do not hesitate to contact us.

Dr. Jeremy Wingate
Rotronic UK

Humidity measurement in Paint Spray Booths

Paint booths in general

Spray painting has existed since the late 1800’s. The technique was developed in a bid to accelerate painting times compared to brush painting. Spray painting is a method of painting where paint is atomised onto a surface via a spray gun. The paint is mixed together with a solvent or water (called a carrier) so that it can be applied correctly.

Cars, aircraft, boats and other such equipment is often spray painted in a spray paint booth.

A spray booth is an enclosed room, designed for spray painting. Depending on the requirements, the booth may be equipped with filtered air to avoid getting dust in the room and an exhaust air system to clear the fumes of any evaporating solvents used during the spray painting process.

Regulations, such as the Occupational Safety & Health Administration from the United States department of Labor have a criteria for design and construction of spray booths state that a spray booth is: a power-ventilated structure provided to enclose or accommodate a spraying operation to confine and limit the escape of spray, vapour and residue, and to safely conduct or direct them to an exhaust system.

Spray paint booths regulate relative humidity, temperature, airflow and pressure to ensure a quality coating and a perfect curing.

Certain paints contain flammable solvents which release flammable fumes: in this case explosion-proof components are required for all measuring equipment that come in contact with the fumes.

Paint dry and cure times
Paint dry and cure times

Why do we need to monitor and measure in Paint Spray Booths

In order for paint to dry correctly within the paint booths, the relative humidity and temperature levels should be within the following conditions:

 – 65 to 75%rh
 – 20 to 24°C

Based upon the intake air, there may be a requirement to either dry or humidify the air in order to reach the desired values. From the temperature side, exactly the same thing: the air might need to be cooled or heated depending on the outside temperature.

Additionally, paint booths might have a  separate monitoring system inside the booths in which the different elements are painted. In order to ensure that the paint is  applied correctly to the element to be painted, it is important to ensure that the surface temperature of the element is not too close to the dew point level in the booth.

If the surface temperature of the element to be painted is close to the dew point temperature, then there will be risks of condensation forming on the surface of the element. If this were to happen, the coating will not be optimal and the drying and curing phase will not be completed properly and the results could be catastrophic.

 

Rotronic have recently launched a totally new range ATEX (Intrinsically Safe and Explosion Proof) instruments. Paint spray booths typically require ATEX certified instruments.

More details here.

Rotronic ATEX range
Rotronic ATEX range

 

Highlights from the Rotronic ISM 2014

A fantastic view of the Swiss mountains complimented an exciting glimpse of the future at the Rotronic International Sales Meeting 2014 in the Swiss mountain village of Grindelwald.

P1060869

The biennial Rotronic ISM brings together distributors and subsidiaries from the global Rotronic network (or family as it feels when we are all together!).

The week long meeting provides an invaluable opportunity to share experiences, projects, new ideas and product updates along with the showing off latest developments and future trends for the company. Aside from the formal workshops, training courses and meetings is the opportunity to informally explore new ventures and insights from around the world – as well as sharing a beer or two of course.

Italy and China!
Italy and China!

The growing range of new product launches from the Swiss HQ, combined with further developments from the UK’s R&D group based around the HygroGen technology highlights that the outlook for the next two years will be very interesting! (check out our new Hygrogen and AwTherm specific satellite sites www.hygrogen.com)

 

The last day of the meeting ensured everyone forgot about instruments for a while as we made our way out into the mountains. Mixed groups were pitched against each other in a fairly weird and wonderful mix of traditional team alpine games including Alphorn blowing and milk chair shuffling (best not to ask)!! Competition was tight but fun had by all.

Alpine games
Alpine games

It was all wrapped up with a fantastic outdoor bbq and the Rotronic awards – the UK team getting an award for the best CO2 product sales performance over the past two years!

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The ISM are important to maintain open communication and share knowledge. Combined with a delicate mix of hard work, fun and fantastic enthusiasm from all the those attending ensures that once again the ISM was a great success!

Team UK
Team UK

Several important announcements were made about new products and future developments including…

  • New ATEX Range (launches very soon!) 
  • Heated HygroMet Probe (now available!)
  • Two new videos coming soon (CO2 measurement and humidity overview)! 

In addition we were given a glimpse of the future… Rotronic UK unveiled the latest HygroGen2 features and the HG2’s bigger brother, the HygroGen2-XL.

New toys!
New toys!

Rotronic AG introduced a new ASIC for the Hygroclip probe range improving reliability and quality without affecting compatibility.

Beyond this there were several very exciting new product ranges on the horizon but these are still under wraps for now… watch this space 🙂

A look at the Beer Brewing Process – Just in time for the Rotronic 2014 International Sales Meeting

Beer brewing in general

There is no exact date, as to when the first beer was brewed but already at the beginning of the fifth millennium BC, people in southern Mesopotamia, in a region known as Sumer (modern Iraq), were brewing beer.

Beer, like other commodities such as wheat and other grains, was used as a currency. A clay tablet, dating from 6’000 BC contains one of the oldest known beer recipes.

Beer Map
Beer consumption throughout the world

The basic ingredients of beer are: water; a starch source: which is able to be fermented; yeast: to produce the fermentation; a flavouring such as hops. Yeast is the microorganism that is responsible for fermentation. Specifically Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the species of yeast that is used for brewing.

Facts & figures:
Beer is the third most popular beverage in the world, coming in directly behind tea and water.
American beer is made mostly from rice. This was invented to give American beer a lighter taste and tap into the market of women buyers.
In the UK 28 million pints of beer are consumed every day, which equates to 100 litres per head each year.
Belgium has over 400 different beer brands.
Cenosillicaphobia is the fear of an empty glass.

There are several steps in the brewing process, which include malting, milling, mashing, lautering, boiling, whirl-pooling, fermenting, conditioning, and filtering.

Step by step brewing:
  • Malting: germination of cereal grains. The sprouted cereal is then kiln dried at around 55°C. Milling: grinding of the malted cereal.
  • Mashing: the cereals are mixed with water and then heated.
  • Lautering: separation of the mash: the liquid (wort) is separated
    from the residual grains.
  • Boiling: the wort is boiled to ensure sterility and then hops are added for flavour!
  • Whirl-pooling: the wort is sent into a whirlpool, removing the dense particles using centrifugal force.
  • Fermenting: yeast is added to the wort: conversion of the carbohydrates to alcohols and carbon dioxide – the chemical conversion of sugars into ethanol!
  • Conditioning: the tank is cooled and the yeast and proteins separate from the beer. This conditioning period is also a maturing period.
  • Filtering: the beer is filtered: stabilising the flavour.
  • Packaging: the beer is packed then to the customers
Example brewing process
Example brewing process
Why the need to measure the carbon dioxide?

Carbon dioxide Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a naturally occurring chemical compound. It is a gas at standard temperature and pressure.

We inhale oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide level in exhaled air is rather constant: around 3,8%. When carbon dioxide is exhaled it will quickly be mixed with the surrounding air even indoors and provided that the ventilation is good, the concentration will be reduced to harmless levels. Indoor carbon dioxide levels usually vary between 400 and 1’200 ppm (parts per million). Outdoor carbon dioxide levels are usually 350 – 450 ppm.

Beer brewing process: Heavily industrialised or contaminated areas may periodically have a higher concentration of CO2. Carbon dioxide is released during the beer brewing process and as you will see below, CO2 is toxic for living organisms. In brewery environments where process generated carbon dioxide is widely present, the maximum permitted carbon dioxide concentration according to most standards is as high as 5’000 ppm (5%) during an 8 hour working period.

Beer storage: Most beer leaves the brewery carbonated: beer and carbon dioxide are sealed in a container under pressure. It can be carbonated during fermentation but it can also be carbonated in the bottle. In this case the beer is allowed to ferment completely. It is left unfiltered which leaves active yeast suspended in it. A small amount of sugar is then added at bottling time. The yeast begins to act on the sugar: CO2 is released and absorbed by the beer.

Beer can also be force carbonated, in which case it is allowed to fully ferment. Then CO2 is pumped into a sealed container with the beer and absorbed by the liquid. In this case, a tank of carbon dioxide will also be required. Undetected leaks in a gas system is a costly waste and a safety risk to personnel. While small leaks are inherent in any gas system, those of significant size raise the level of economic and safety risk.

How does CO2 affect the human body?

Due to the health risks associated with carbon dioxide exposure, there are regulations and laws in place to avoid exposure! The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) states that carbon dioxide concentrations exceeding 4% are immediately dangerous to life and health.

In indoor spaces occupied by people: concentrations higher than 1’000 ppm will cause  discomfort in more than 20% of occupants. At 2’000 ppm, the majority of occupants will feel a significant degree of discomfort and many will develop nausea and headaches.

How CO2 affects the body
How CO2 affects the body

Case study: The lake Nyos
The lake Nyos is a crater lake situated in Cameroon. In 1986, a pocket of magma from under the lake, leaked a large amount of CO2 into the air. The result was suffocation of around 1’700 people and 3’500 livestock!

As we take beer brewing seriously we will be sure to test a number of varieties with our colleagues from the world over at the Rotronic 2014 International Sales meeting in Grindelwald next week!

Dr Jeremy Wingate
Rotronic UK